June 27, 2017

Richard Allen Anderson (1948-1969)

Richard Allen Anderson, Medal of Honor recipient, was born at Washington, D.C., on April 16, 1948. He entered the military service in Houston, Texas. On August 24, 1969, Lance Corporal Richard Anderson, United States Marine Corps, Company E, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, Third Marine Division, was serving as assistant team leader against an armed enemy in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam. While conducting a reconnaissance patrol his team came under heavy automatic-weapon fire that severely wounded Anderson. He continued firing in an attempt to repulse the enemy and was wounded a second time. While a companion attended his wounds he continued relentless fire. When a grenade landed between him and the other marine, Anderson rolled over and covered the grenade to absorb the detonation. By his courage and self sacrifice he saved several Marines from injury and possible death. Source


CITATION
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an assistant team leader with Company E, in connection with combat operations against an armed enemy. While conducting a patrol during the early morning hours L/Cpl. Anderson's reconnaissance team came under a heavy volume of automatic weapons and machine gun fire from a numerically superior and well concealed enemy force. Although painfully wounded in both legs and knocked to the ground during the initial moments of the fierce fire fight, L/Cpl. Anderson assumed a prone position and continued to deliver intense suppressive fire in an attempt to repulse the attackers. Moments later he was wounded a second time by an enemy soldier who had approached to within 8 feet of the team's position. Undaunted, he continued to pour a relentless stream of fire at the assaulting unit, even while a companion was treating his leg wounds. Observing an enemy grenade land between himself and the other marine, L/Cpl. Anderson immediately rolled over and covered the lethal weapon with his body, absorbing the full effects of the detonation. By his indomitable courage, inspiring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, L/Cpl. Anderson was instrumental in saving several marines from serious injury or possible death. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

COORDINATES
29° 42.630
-095° 18.162

Section 33
Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery
Houston

June 20, 2017

Timothy Pilsbury (1780-1858)

Timothy Pilsbury, Republic of Texas and United States congressman, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on April 12, 1780. After moving to Maine, where he engaged in shipping, he served as representative in the Maine legislature in 1825-26 and Executive Council member from 1827 to 1836. After a brief period in Ohio and New Orleans, he moved in 1837 to Brazoria County, Texas, where he engaged in farming. Pilsbury represented Brazoria County in the House of the Republic in 1840 and 1841 and the Senate in 1842. After serving as Brazoria County chief justice and probate judge, he returned to the Senate in 1845 and on March 30, 1846, was elected by the Texas legislature as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives. In Washington he represented a district that included all of Texas west of the Trinity River until March 13, 1849. He ran unsuccessfully for reelection in 1848. Pilsbury, who was a Mason, died in Henderson, Texas, on November 23, 1858, and was buried in the city cemetery. Source 

COORDINATES
32° 09.249
-094° 48.089


Henderson City Cemetery
Henderson

June 13, 2017

August Rodney "Gus" Mancuso (1905-1984)

Gus Mancuso was an American professional baseball player, coach, scout and radio sports commentator. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball with the St. Louis Cardinals (1928, 1930-32, 1941-42), New York Giants (1933-38, 1942-44), Chicago Cubs (1939), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940) and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). He was known for his capable handling of pitching staffs and for his on-field leadership abilities. He was a member of five National League pennant-winning teams, and played as the catcher for five pitchers who were eventually inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He was regarded as one of the top defensive catchers of the 1930s.

In 1946, Mancuso became the player-manager of the minor league Tulsa Oilers and in 1948 took over as manager of the San Antonio Missions. In 1950, he was hired as the pitching coach for the Cincinnati Reds, then began a career as a broadcaster in 1951 with his hometown Houston team in the Texas League. He later moved to St. Louis where he worked with play-by-play announcer Harry Caray on the Cardinals' radio network until 1954, when he served as a scout for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Houston Colt .45s. In 1962 Mancuso was seriously injured in a traffic accident which killed his wife, Lorena. In 1981, he was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1981 and elected to the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame in 1984. He contracted emphysema in 1984 and died at the age of 78 in Houston. Source

COORDINATES
29° 42.826
-095° 18.138

Section 55
Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery
Houston

June 6, 2017

Shubael Marsh (1797-1868)

Shubael Marsh, one of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred colonists, was born in Portland, Maine. He took the oath of loyalty to the Mexican government in April 1824 and received title to a sitio of land in what is now Brazoria County on July 8, 1824. The census of March 1826 listed him as a single man, aged between twenty-five and forty. In August 1830 he was living at Brazoria when he was appointed to collect money to supply an army in case of a Spanish invasion. As síndico procurador, he presided over an election at Bolivar on December 12, 1830. In 1831 he married Lucinda Pitts, and he and his brothers-in-law, Levi and John Pitts, lived west of Hidalgo in Washington County. Marsh applied for three-fourths of a league of land on Spring Creek on November 5, 1835. He petitioned for the organization of Washington municipality and in May 1839 was a trustee of Independence Female Academy. He died in 1868. Source


COORDINATES
30° 19.744
-096° 21.687


Old Independence Cemetery
Independence