October 22, 2019

Edward Millican

   Elliott McNeil Millican, pioneer physician and legislator, the son of Nancy Jane (McNeil) and Robert Hemphill Millican, was born in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, in 1808. In December 1821 he arrived in Texas as one of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred colonists with his parents, eight brothers, and two sisters. He received title to a sitio of land adjoining his father's grant on March 31, 1831. He was appointed constable of Washington County in 1839 and was elected sheriff of Navasota County in 1841. When the Congress of the Republic of Texas formed Brazos County in 1843, Millican was appointed sheriff. In elections held in Brazos County in March 1839 he was elected to the office, which he held until 1844, when he was elected representative for Brazos County to the Ninth Congress of the republic (1844–45). When Austin was chosen to replace Washington-on-the-Brazos as capital, Millican signed a resolution protesting the move. He was elected representative from Brazos County to the First, Second, and Third Texas legislatures. He was elected senator from Brazos County to the Fifth and Sixth legislatures. He resigned from the Senate during the sixth session because of a widespread epidemic; as one of the few physicians resident in Brazos County, he thought he was needed there. He devoted himself to his medical practice until his death. Millican married Elizabeth Clampitt, a member of Austin's second colony and daughter of Susanah G. Clampitt, on June 14, 1827, at Fort Tenoxtitl├ín. They had four sons and three daughters. After Elizabeth's death Millican married Marcella Elizabeth Boyce Triplett, who had a young son by a previous marriage. The couple had four more sons. As members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Millican and his first wife donated 1½ acres of land for a church building; the Millican United Methodist Church still occupied this land in 1990. In 1859, when the Houston and Texas Central Railway extended its line to his community, Millican sold land to the railroad for its right-of-way; the tracks were still in use in 1990. Millican's home was known as the Log Cabin Inn and served as a popular hotel and restaurant. Millican died at his home in Millican during a cholera epidemic on October 13, 1860. Source

COORDINATES
30° 28.286, -096° 12.997


Weaver Cemetery
Millican

October 15, 2019

William Millican

   William Templeton Millican, pioneer, attorney, and public official, the son of Nancy Jane (McNeil) and Robert Hemphill Millican, was born in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, in the 1780s. As a member of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred colonists he arrived in Texas in December 1821, in company with other members of the Millican family. He received title to one sitio of land in what is now Brazos County on July 16, 1824. Horatio Chriesman had surveyed the land by October, but by September 1825 Millican had moved to land purchased from Henry Whitesides and Jack C. Davis and was in conflict with Henry and Boland Whitesides over his title. The census of March 1826 listed Millican as a farmer and stock raiser, aged between twenty-five and forty. His household included his wife, Libitha, two sons, two daughters, and one slave. In July 1826 his home was a polling place for the election of delegates to a provisional judiciary for the colony. He was elected as a delegate from the Washington district to the Consultation of 1835. In 1839 he was elected justice of the peace for Washington County. He was appointed agent for various Washington County residents in 1840, and in 1841 he was elected justice of the peace for Navasota County. Millican served in the Texas army during the Texas Revolution and was to receive a bounty warrant for 320 acres from the secretary of war for service from April 25, 1836, to July 25, 1836. He died in September 1843, however, and the Brazos County land was not patented to him until October 10, 1845. In a letter filed in the probate court of Brazos County, his brother, Dr. Elliott McNeil Millican, stated that their mother was William Millican's only heir-at-law, and she received title to his land. At his death, Millican was survived by his wife, three sons, and four daughters.

COORDINATES
30° 28.283, -096° 21.030


Weaver Cemetery
Millican