September 30, 2016

Nicholas Mosby Dawson (1808-1848)

Nicholas Mosby Dawson, hero of the Texas Revolution, was born in Woolford, Kentucky, in 1808. He later moved with his parents to White County, Tennessee, where he attended school. He moved to Texas in 1834 and settled in Fayette County near the home of a relative, William Mosby Eastland. Dawson enlisted in the revolutionary army on January 24, 1836, and within a week was elected to the rank of second lieutenant of Company B, Texas Volunteers. He participated in the battle of San Jacinto. He served as captain of a militia company in 1840 during an Indian campaign in what is now Mitchell County. In August 1837 he was a lieutenant in Company C and in 1842 was captain of a company of volunteers under John H. Moore. He was residing in Fayette County when Adrián Woll invaded Texas in the fall of 1842. Dawson organized a small company of some fifteen men and left La Grange on September 16, 1842. Soon his company numbered fifty-three men, recruited from settlements in Fayette, Gonzales, and DeWitt counties. While attempting to join Texas forces under Mathew Caldwell on Salado Creek near San Antonio, Dawson and his men were surrounded by a large number of Mexican cavalry on September 18. The following battle, known as the Dawson Massacre, resulted in the death or capture of nearly all the Texans. Dawson was among the casualties. On September 18, 1848, his remains and those of thirty-five other victims of the battle were buried along with casualties from the Mier expedition in a vault on Monument Hill near La Grange. Dawson County is named for Nicholas Dawson. Source

COORDINATES
29° 53.339
-096° 52.618


Monument Hill State Historic Site
La Grange

September 27, 2016

John Allen Monroe (1898-1956)

John Allen Monroe, born on August 24th, 1898 in Farmersville, Texas, played for eight seasons in the Pacific Coast League between 1926-1933 as a member of the Sacramento Senators (1926-29), Mission Reds (1930-31), and Portland Beavers (1931-33). After hitting .295 and .296 in his first two seasons in the PCL, the left-handed hitting, right-handed throwing second baseman never hit below .321 in his six remaining PCL seasons. For his career, Monroe posted a .326 batting average in 1,295 PCL games while also collecting 1,621 hits, 309 doubles, 45 triples and 80 home runs. In 1930, at the age of 31, he set career-highs in hits and home runs with 241 and 28, respectively. The following season, in 1931, he posted a career-best .362 batting average - 6th best in the PCL that season - while splitting his season with Mission and Portland. During his first full season with Portland in 1932, he helped the Beavers win their first PCL Championship since 1914. Monroe began his professional baseball career in 1920 and played in the big leagues for one season in 1921, beginning the year with the New York Giants, the World Series champion of that season, and ending it with the Philadelphia Phillies. He died on June 19th, 1956 in Conroe, Texas. He was 57 years old. In 2011, he was inducted into the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.

COORDINATES
30° 21.033
-095° 28.828


Garden Park Cemetery
Conroe

September 23, 2016

Isaac McGary (1800-?)

Isaac McGary, early settler and soldier, was born in 1800 in Butler County, Ohio, the son of John McGary. He moved to Texas with Stephen F. Austin and fought at the battle of San Jacinto, after which he helped guard Antonio López de Santa Anna. McGary received a donation land grant for his participation in the battle, and his name is on the San Jacinto monument. He also served as a private under Capt. James Gillaspie in the Mexican War. His name is on the Gillaspie Memorial Marker in Huntsville. McGary served as sheriff of Montgomery County in 1843. When Walker County was formed, he was elected the first county clerk. He served in this capacity from 1846 to 1852. In 1854 he was chief justice of Walker County. McGary was a Mason in Forest Lodge No. 19. In the 1850 census he is listed as fifty years old, married to Elizabeth (Visier), a French immigrant, age thirty-four. Three children are listed. Elizabeth died in 1853 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Huntsville. While on a trip to the coast, McGary died in Galveston and buried there. Source 

Note: Unmarked. Isaac McGary was buried in Soldiers Rest, a section of the Old Potters Field cemetery set aside specifically for veterans in 1864. His tombstone, as well as most of the grave markers in the cemetery, was washed away in the 1900 hurricane. During the reconstruction of the island, the ruined graveyard was renamed Oleander Cemetery, the ground level was raised several feet and the original section boundaries of Soldier's Rest, and all the graves therein, were lost.

COORDINATES
N/A

Soldiers Rest (defunct)
Oleander Cemetery
Galveston

September 20, 2016

Charlotte Marie Baldwin Allen (1805-1895)

Charlotte Marie Baldwin Allen, called "the mother of Houston," was born on July 14, 1805, in Onondaga County, New York, the daughter of Eliza (Warden) and Jonas Cutler Baldwin. On May 3, 1831, she married Augustus Chapman Allen, a New York businessman. The following year Allen and his brother, John Kirby Allen, came to Texas and settled at San Augustine, then at Nacogdoches. Charlotte Allen probably arrived in Texas in 1834, and her inheritance helped the brothers to speculate in land. In August 1836 the Allen brothers purchased a half league of land on Buffalo Bayou for $5,000. Four days later they advertised the establishment of a prosperous new city called Houston, which may have been so named at Charlotte's suggestion. In any event, the name apparently attracted settlement to the area and influenced the decision to make Houston the capital of the Republic of Texas, a role it held from 1837 to 1839. The Allen brothers built the first statehouse, near Charlotte and A. C. Allen's home at Prairie and Caroline streets. Sam Houston lived next door to the Allens, and from their home Mary Austin Holley drew the first sketches of the capitol. When John Allen died in 1838, Charlotte and Augustus disagreed over the estate settlement, and they separated in 1850.

Augustus moved on to Mexico and Washington, D.C., where he died in 1864; Charlotte remained in Houston and became one of the city's best-known citizens over the next forty-five years. In 1857 she sold the capitol site, which had become the location of the Capitol Hotel, for $12,000. The following year the hotel was the scene of Anson Jones's suicide; the land eventually became the site of the Rice Hotel. After the Civil War Charlotte Allen's home became the headquarters for the commanding general of federal troops in Houston. She deeded property, eventually called Market Square, to the city for a city hall and markethouse; because the original deed was lost she deeded it a second time, in 1895. In 1890, the day after her eighty-fifth birthday, the Houston Daily Post referred to her as the "connecting link between Houston's past and present history." Charlotte Allen had four children, but only one, daughter Martha Elizabeth, survived to maturity. She died on August 3, 1895, in Houston, at the age of ninety and was buried in Glenwood Cemetery. Charlotte Baldwin Allen Elementary School was named in her honor in 1907; it was the first public school in Houston to be named for a woman. In 1911 her home was razed to provide a site for the Gulf Building. A Texas Historical Marker was erected in her honor in Glenwood Cemetery in 2009. Source

COORDINATES
29° 45.890
-095° 23.231

Section E2
Glenwood Cemetery
Houston

September 16, 2016

Nicholas Descomps Labadie (1802-1867)

Nicholas Descomps Labadie, physician, pharmacist, and entrepreneur, was born on December 5, 1802, in Assumption Parish, Windsor, Ontario, the son of Antoine Louis and Charlotte (Barthe) Labadie. His father, a fur trader, died when he was five, and his older siblings helped send Nicholas to the parish school, where he did well. At about age twenty-one, hoping to escape the poverty of the area, he traveled to Perry County, Missouri, to become a priest at St. Mary's of the Barrens, a Lazarist college founded in 1820. He studied with John Timon and Jean Marie Odin, two priests who later led the Catholic Church in Texas. Labadie forsook the priesthood by 1828, decided to become a doctor, and moved to St. Louis, where he studied under Dr. Samuel Merry, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, and supported himself by clerking for a merchant. Labadie mastered both medical and pharmacology practices of the day and in the spring of 1830 moved to Fort Jesup, Louisiana, where he clerked for Harrison and Hopkins and may have practiced medicine. In January 1831 he visited San Felipe and decided that his best prospects lay at Anahuac, where a garrison had been established.

   He left the Brazos for New Orleans, where he bought medicines, and reached Anahuac in March. Col. John Davis Bradburn employed him as post surgeon and gave him a town lot on which to build his home and office, where he treated his civilian neighbors. He participated in a mercantile partnership with Charles Willcox from June 1831 through 1833. Angered because his sinecure as post surgeon was terminated on November 9, 1831, Labadie sided with the insurgents in June 1832 and joined in the attack against Bradburn. The doctor wrote about the events at Anahuac for the Texas Almanac for 1859. Between 1833 and 1838 Labadie lived on his plantation on the shore of Lake Charlotte, a site that connected with the Trinity River north of Wallisville, where he raised hogs, corn, cattle, and honey for market and practiced medicine. He marched to join Sam Houston's army with the Liberty militia on March 11, 1836. At the Groce family's Bernardo Plantation he was appointed surgeon of the first regiment of regulars on April 6 and treated the various camp illnesses. He later fought under Gen. Sidney Sherman and tended the wounded at San Jacinto. He recorded his reminiscences of that campaign in the same volume of the Almanac. John Forbes, commissary general of the Texas army at San Jacinto, sued Labadie for libel in the district court of Nacogdoches County, and the suit was not finally dismissed until 1867. Labadie returned to his home in May 1836 to find it had been ransacked by looters, his wife and children having fled towards the Neches River.

   In September 1838 under orders from Secretary of War Thomas J. Rusk he moved with his family to Galveston, where he continued to practice medicine and pharmacy and also sold such sundries as paint and paper. He invested in real estate, conducted a boarding house, and built the first Catholic church there. In 1851 he traded his plantation on Lake Charlotte to Michel B. Menard for Galveston wharf rights and built Labadie's Wharf near the foot of Twenty-sixth Street. Here he operated a line of sailing vessels to Pensacola, Florida, that imported lumber. During the Civil War Labadie served as examining physician for draftees in 1863 and as surgeon of the First Regiment, Texas Militia, in Galveston. His wife, Mary (Norment), whom he had married in November 1831 when Father Michael Muldoon visited Anahuac, died during the yellow fever epidemic in 1839. He married Mrs. Agnes Rivera, formerly of New York, in Galveston in December 1840 before his old acquaintance, Father Timon. She bore him a son in 1841, but she died in 1843 during another fever epidemic. Labadie was married a third time, to Julia A. Seymour, a native of Connecticut, in September 1846; they had no children. One of his sons-in-law, Ebenezer T. Barstow, became Labadie's business partner. The doctor died on March 13, 1867, and was buried in the Catholic Cemetery, Galveston. Source

COORDINATES
29° 17.600
-094° 48.779


Old Catholic Cemetery
Galveston

September 13, 2016

Thomas Henry Ball (1859-1944)

Thomas H. Ball, lawyer, prohibitionist politician, and promoter of publicly owned Houston port facilities, son of M. O. (Spivey) Cleveland and Rev. Thomas Henry Ball, was born on January 14, 1859, in Huntsville, Texas. His father, a Methodist minister, had moved to Huntsville from Virginia in 1856 to become president of Andrew Female College. Ball's parents died, and he was left at the age of six in the care of his uncle, Lt. Sidney Spivey, a Confederate veteran, who sent him to private schools for his primary and secondary education. After graduating from Austin College in 1871, Ball worked as a farmhand and clerk and attended lectures at the University of Virginia, where he was elected president of the law class. He returned to Texas, was admitted to the bar in 1888, and was thrice elected mayor of Huntsville, a post he held from 1877 to 1892. He practiced law in Huntsville until 1902, when he moved to Houston. Ball first became active in Texas politics in 1887 as an advocate of a prohibition amendment to the state constitution. He held many state Democratic party posts and was elected to the United States Congress in 1896. He resigned in 1903 to return to a Houston law practice that primarily served railroad and corporate clients. In 1911 he was selected chairman of the Prohibition Statewide Executive Committee, and many prohibitionists encouraged him to run against incumbent governor Oscar Branch Colquitt, who was up for reelection in 1912. Ball declined, and lent his support to Judge William F. Ramsey, who was easily defeated by the anti-prohibitionists.

In 1914 at a pre-primary elimination convention, Ball emerged as the prohibitionist standard-bearer with the slogan "Play Ball." Both wet and dry forces assumed he would win the coming gubernatorial nomination. But political newcomer James Edward Ferguson won support by focusing on farm tenant reform. Late endorsements of Ball by President Woodrow Wilson and William Jennings Bryan backfired when Ferguson also asserted that national politicians should stay out of Texas politics. Ferguson won the nomination in July. Ball lost because of his refusal to embrace other prohibitionist demands, growing uneasiness about his legal service for large corporations, his friendship with Joseph Weldon Bailey, his own lackluster campaigning, and Ferguson's skillful demagogy. In addition to Ball's prohibitionist activities, he was also a lifelong, vigorous promoter of publicly owned port facilities in Texas. As a member of the Rivers and Harbors Committee in the United States House of Representatives, he secured the first federal aid for development of the Houston Ship Channel in 1899. After leaving Washington he lobbied the state legislature and the United States Congress heavily, determined to facilitate local, state, and federal efforts to upgrade Houston port facilities. Both bodies soon passed measures significantly aiding local navigation districts. Following the development of Buffalo Bayou, Ball served as general counsel to the Port Commission of Houston. He married Minnie F. Thomason in 1882. They had three children and adopted three more. In 1907 the community of Peck, just northwest of Houston, was renamed Tomball in Ball's honor. Ball died in Houston on May 7, 1944. Source

COORDINATES
29° 43.164
-095° 18.239

Mimosa Section 11
Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery
Houston

September 9, 2016

Sampson Connell (1787-1845)

Sampson Connell, son of Giles and Elizabeth Gibbs Connell, was born about 1787 near Spartanburg, South Carolina. He married Millie Cook about 1810 in Tennessee, and the two went on to have ten children. He fought in the War of 1812 as well as the Battle of New Orleans. Sampson, his wife and seven of their children emigrated to Texas in 1834, first settling in Mina where Millie died in August 1834. he became a wagon master for the Texan Army and listed in the garrison at Bexar in February, 1836, and it is believed that he delivered the last load of supplies to the Alamo before it was barricaded. He was in Gonzales when he heard the news of the Goliad Massacre and the Fall of the Alamo. He fought at the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, as part of Captain Jesse Billingsley's Company of Mina Volunteers. By 1838, he was married to Sarah J. (last name unrecorded) and his family were all living in Washington County, where he was granted a league of land for his military service. He died on July 27, 1845 while living near Brenham and buried in an unmarked grave.

Note: Connell's grave was unmarked when he was buried and the exact location has been lost, but it is likely he rests somewhere in the photo below, as this area is where many who died in 1846-1848 lie.

COORDINATES
N/A


Old Independence Cemetery
Independence

William P. Massey (?-?)

William Massey [Massie] came to Texas in 1835 from parts unknown and enlisted in the Texas army on April 4, 1836. Assigned a soldier in Captain Amasa Turner's Company, he was with them at the Battle of San Jacinto. After the battle, Massey was stationed on Galveston Island as part of Captain John Smith's Company and discharged on October 25, 1837. He received his first land grant for his military service in March 1838 for a third of a league in Harrisburg, now Harris, County, and his second certificate in October 1838 for 1,280 acres of land in Montgomery County. Massey sold off his headright in Montgomery County and settled in Houston. He was initially buried in the city's Episcopal Cemetery, but when the cemetery was scheduled to be razed for neglect in the 1950s, he was reinterred in Glenwood.
   
COORDINATES
29° 45.832
-095° 22.896

Section G1
Glenwood Cemetery
Houston

September 6, 2016

Darrell K. Royal (1924-2012)

Darrell K. Royal, born in Hollis, Oklahoma, on July 6, 1924, helped Coach Bud Wilkinson build the post–World War II University of Oklahoma (OU) Sooners football dynasty, and later went south of the Red River to build his own dynasty with the University of Texas Longhorns. He coached Texas to twenty consecutive winning seasons, including sixteen bowl appearances, three national championships, and six consecutive Southwest Conference titles. His teams were undefeated twice and won eight bowl games among ten appearances in the Cotton Bowl, three in the Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl, and one each in the Orange, Sugar, and Gator bowls. Royal joined the Sooners as a player in 1946 and became an All-American quarterback. He also played defensive back and was a punter in 1948, when the Sooners went undefeated and beat Louisiana State 35-0 in the Sugar Bowl. His ninety-six-yard punt return remains an OU record, and the Sooners earned a 36-6-1 record during his four years as a player. He worked as an assistant coach at North Carolina State University, University of Tulsa, and Mississippi State University. He coached Edmonton in the Canadian Football League for one season and then returned as head coach at Mississippi State University. He coached at the University of Washington for one year before going to Texas in 1957. In 1962 he also took over as the athletic director and continued this role for three years after retiring as coach in 1976. Royal's honors include Coach of the Year twice each from the Football Writers Association and American Football Coaches Association. He is a member of the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame and was named to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983. Coach Royal died on November 7, 2012, in Austin, Texas. Source

COORDINATES
30° 15.969
-097° 43.582

Monument Hill
Texas State Cemetery
Austin

September 2, 2016

John Marshall Wade (1815-1879)

John Wade, soldier, newspaperman, and surveyor, was born in New York in 1815. While in the Creek Indian nation, he was advised by Sam Houston to travel to Nacogdoches, Texas, where he arrived in October 1835. Wade joined Thomas J. Rusk's company, bound for Bexar, but became ill on the way and was left at San Felipe. While recovering from his illness he went to Montgomery, where he remained until after the Texas Declaration of Independence. On March 12, 1836, he joined Capt. Joseph L. Bennett's company, afterwards commanded by Capt. William Ward. Wade and four others were detailed to man the Twin Sisters. After the battle of San Jacinto he rejoined Ware's company and was discharged on June 12, 1836. On July 4, 1836, he was elected captain of a company stationed at Victoria. A printer by profession, Wade worked on the Telegraph and Texas Register at Columbia and Houston. He was also deputy surveyor of Montgomery County. In 1845 he began publishing the Montgomery Patriot, which was afterwards moved to Huntsville. He returned to Montgomery County in 1854 and served again as deputy surveyor until after the Civil War, when he was removed from office by Governor Edmund J. Davis. Wade died in Travis County on October 9, 1879. Source

Note: Unmarked. The original sexton's records state that John Wade is buried in the plot below, somewhere near the upright tablet stone.

COORDINATES
30° 16.536
-097° 43.567
Section 2
Oakwood Cemetery
Austin