Along with everything else, Hurricane Harvey took with it decades worth of files, maps, notes, coordinates, names and research I had on my external hard drive; so for the time being, this site will be on hiatus until I finish republishing. I will upload as I go, so each post will reappear on its original date and can be found in the Archive section in the right sidebar. If you need to contact me for any reason in the duration, my contact info is found in my profile. Wish me luck, guys. - JES

April 29, 2016

Alexander Wray Ewing

   Alexander Wray Ewing, early Texas doctor, was born in 1809 in Londonderry, Ireland. He studied medicine at Trinity College, Dublin, and at the College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. He moved to Pennsylvania and in 1834 to Texas. He lived briefly at San Felipe and acquired a quarter league now in Fayette County in 1835. He was appointed surgeon general of the Texas army on April 6, 1836, and treated Sam Houston's wound at the battle of San Jacinto. Ewing incurred President David G. Burnet's wrath by accompanying the wounded Houston to Galveston. He was dismissed by Burnet but was soon reinstated. The Texas Congress blocked President Houston's move to keep Ewing as chief medical officer in 1837, and he was succeeded in this post by Ashbel Smith. Ewing moved to Houston, where he became first president of that city's Medical and Surgical Society in 1838. He also was a member of a "committee of arrangements" for the proposed Houston and Brazos Rail Road Company. By 1842 Ewing was again serving in the army. He was married three times within a period of ten years - to Mrs. Susan Henrietta Smiley Reid, who died in 1842, to Elizabeth Tompkins, and to Elizabeth Graham, who died in 1904. Ewing had at least two children, and by 1850 owned real property valued at $6,000. He was a Mason. He died on November 1, 1853. Source

Note: Unmarked. Founders Memorial Park, originally founded in 1836 as Houston's first city cemetery, was rapidly filled due to a yellow fever epidemic and closed to further burials around 1840. The cemetery became neglected over a period of time, often vandalized and was heavily damaged by the 1900 hurricane. In 1936, despite a massive clean up effort, a century of neglect had taken its toll. The vast majority of grave markers were either destroyed or missing and poor record keeping prevented locating individual graves. Several cenotaphs were placed in random areas throughout the park in honor of the more high-profile citizens buried there, but a great number of graves go unmarked to this day. Alexander Ewing's is one of them.

COORDINATES
N/A


Founders Memorial Park
Houston

April 19, 2016

Milford Phillips Norton

   Milford Phillips Norton, lawyer, publisher, judge, and civic leader, the son of Peter and Aseneth (Blossom) Norton, was born in 1794 at Readfield, Maine. He was admitted to the bar and practiced at Bangor and Readfield. In 1830-31 he was state land agent; in 1838 he served in the Maine legislature and was on the commission to locate the northeast boundary of the state; he was a member of the state Senate in 1839. Norton was married first to Sarah Ann Gilman and after her death to Mary Stevens Russell. After financial reverses due to suretyship, Norton moved to Texas in early 1839 to look after his father-in-law's lands. He decided to remain in the republic permanently and sent for his family. He formed a law partnership with Alexander H. Phillips and practiced at Galveston until December 26, 1840, when the firm's business required his removal to Black Point in Refugio County, where a client, Joseph F. Smith, was planning the townsite of Saint Mary's. The Norton family resided at Black Point until September 1841, when they moved to Montgomery County, where Norton practiced at Bayou City.

   Norton was appointed postmaster of Houston and moved there to assume his duties on January 8, 1844. At the same time he bought the Civilian, which he renamed the Democrat and turned into an Anson Jones-for-president and annexation organ. Shortly after Jones's election President Sam Houston appointed Norton judge of the Sixth Judicial District. He assumed office on September 8, 1844, but the validity of the recess appointment was challenged. Norton considered the argument well-taken and resigned but was elected by Congress at the next session. He was chairman of the Convention of 1845. After annexation he requested of Governor J. P. Henderson a transfer to the Western District of Texas. The governor acceded, the nomination was confirmed on April 14, 1846, and the Nortons moved to Corpus Christi. At the end of his term Judge Norton and his family moved to Refugio County, where his son, Henry D. Norton, had established a store at Copano. Norton practiced law at Copano until Henry L. Kinney, who was arranging to embark on his filibustering expedition against Nicaragua, employed him to return to Corpus Christi and manage the Kinney business. When Judge James Webb died in November 1856, Norton accepted appointment as judge of the Fourteenth District but continued to manage Kinney's affairs until 1858. Norton was an outstanding civic leader and prominent Mason. He died at San Antonio on June 8, 1860. Source

COORDINATES
29° 25.279, -098° 27.947


City Cemetery #5
San Antonio