March 1, 2015

Glenn Corbett

Glenn Edwin Rothenburg
August 17, 1933 - El Monte, California
January 16, 1993 - San Antonio, Texas

Actor, The Crimson Kimono (1959)

GPS Coordinates
29° 28.564, -098° 25.806

Section Q
Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
San Antonio

February 25, 2015

Cecil Hamilton Bolton

Cecil Hamilton Bolton
October 7, 1908 - Crawfordville, Florida
January 22, 1965 - San Antonio, Texas

World War II Medal of Honor

Citation
As leader of the weapons platoon of Company E, 413th Infantry, on the night of 2 November 1944, he fought gallantly in a pitched battle which followed the crossing of the Mark River in Holland. When 2 machineguns pinned down his company, he tried to eliminate, with mortar fire, their grazing fire which was inflicting serious casualties and preventing the company's advance from an area rocked by artillery shelling. In the moonlight it was impossible for him to locate accurately the enemy's camouflaged positions; but he continued to direct fire until wounded severely in the legs and rendered unconscious by a German shell. When he recovered consciousness he instructed his unit and then crawled to the forward rifle platoon positions. Taking a two-man bazooka team on his voluntary mission, he advanced chest deep in chilling water along a canal toward 1 enemy machinegun. While the bazooka team covered him, he approached alone to within 15 yards of the hostile emplacement in a house. He charged the remaining distance and killed the 2 gunners with hand grenades. Returning to his men he led them through intense fire over open ground to assault the second German machinegun. An enemy sniper who tried to block the way was dispatched, and the trio pressed on. When discovered by the machinegun crew and subjected to direct fire, 1st Lt. Bolton killed 1 of the 3 gunners with carbine fire, and his 2 comrades shot the others. Continuing to disregard his wounds, he led the bazooka team toward an 88-mm. artillery piece which was having telling effect on the American ranks, and approached once more through icy canal water until he could dimly make out the gun's silhouette. Under his fire direction, the two soldiers knocked out the enemy weapon with rockets. On the way back to his own lines he was again wounded. To prevent his men being longer subjected to deadly fire, he refused aid and ordered them back to safety, painfully crawling after them until he reached his lines, where he collapsed. 1st Lt. Bolton's heroic assaults in the face of vicious fire, his inspiring leadership, and continued aggressiveness even through suffering from serious wounds, contributed in large measure to overcoming strong enemy resistance and made it possible for his battalion to reach its objective.

GPS Coordinates
29° 28.697, -098° 25.960

Section PC
Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
San Antonio

February 22, 2015

Benjamin Johnson

Benjamin Johnson
June 8, 1815 - Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana
October 13, 1872 - Jefferson County, Texas

Soldier of San Jacinto

GPS Coordinates
29° 43.108, -093° 54.319


Sabine Pass Cemetery
Sabine Pass

February 18, 2015

Samuel Bronson Cooper

Samuel Bronson Cooper
May 30, 1850 - Eddyville, Kentucky
August 21, 1918 - New York City, New York

United States Congressman (1893-1905, 1907-1909)

GPS Coordinates
30° 06.146, -094° 06.107


Magnolia Cemetery
Beaumont

February 15, 2015

Milton Arthur Lee

Milton Arthur Lee
February 28, 1949 - Shreveport, Louisiana
April 26, 1968 - Phu Bai, Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam

Vietnam War Medal of Honor

Citation
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pfc. Lee distinguished himself near the city of Phu Bai in the province of Thua Thien. Pfc. Lee was serving as the radio telephone operator with the 3d platoon, Company B. As lead element for the company, the 3d platoon received intense surprise hostile fire from a force of North Vietnamese Army regulars in well-concealed bunkers. With 50 percent casualties, the platoon maneuvered to a position of cover to treat their wounded and reorganize, while Pfc. Lee moved through the heavy enemy fire giving lifesaving first aid to his wounded comrades. During the subsequent assault on the enemy defensive positions, Pfc. Lee continuously kept close radio contact with the company commander, relaying precise and understandable orders to his platoon leader. While advancing with the front rank toward the objective, Pfc. Lee observed 4 North Vietnamese soldiers with automatic weapons and a rocket launcher Lying in wait for the lead element of the platoon. As the element moved forward, unaware of the concealed danger, Pfc. Lee immediately and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, passed his radio to another soldier and charged through the murderous fire. Without hesitation he continued his assault, overrunning the enemy position, killing all occupants and capturing 4 automatic weapons and a rocket launcher. Pfc. Lee continued his 1-man assault on the second position through a heavy barrage of enemy automatic weapons fire. Grievously wounded, he continued to press the attack, crawling forward into a firing position and delivering accurate covering fire to enable his platoon to maneuver and destroy the position. Not until the position was overrun did Pfc. Lee falter in his steady volume of fire and succumb to his wounds. Pfc. Lee's heroic actions saved the lives of the lead element and were instrumental in the destruction of the key position of the enemy defense. Pfc. Lee's gallantry at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, the 502d Infantry, and the U.S. Army.

GPS Coordinates
29° 28.669, -098° 25.773

Section X
Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
San Antonio