Along with everything else, Hurricane Harvey took with it decades worth of files, maps, notes, coordinates, names and research I had on my external hard drive; so for the time being, this site will be on hiatus until I finish republishing. I will upload as I go, so each post will reappear on its original date and can be found in the Archive section in the right sidebar. If you need to contact me for any reason in the duration, my contact info is found in my profile. Wish me luck, guys. - JES

March 18, 2016

Paschal Pavolo Borden

   Paschal Pavolo Borden, soldier, merchant, and surveyor, brother of Gail, Jr., Thomas H., and John P. Borden and son of Gail and Philadelphia (Wheeler) Borden, Sr., was born in Norwich, New York, in December 1806. The family moved to Kentucky, to Indiana, and, in 1829, to Texas. Borden served as an official surveyor for the state of Coahuila and Texas. On March 4, 1831, he received 1,102 acres of land in Stephen F. Austin's second colony, on Mill Creek in what is now Washington County. From 1831 to 1835 he farmed and helped in his father's blacksmith shop in San Felipe. During the Texas Revolution Borden was a member of Capt. John Bird's company from October 24 to December 13, 1835. He then served as a private in Moseley Baker's company until June 1, 1836. He fought in the battle of San Jacinto and was therefore granted 3,306 acres of land by the Fort Bend county board. In late 1836 at Columbia, he opened a general store with H. F. Armstrong, and in December 1837 he began a term as Fort Bend county surveyor, a position he combined with a private real estate enterprise. In September 1846 he was named administrator of the estate of Moses Lapham. By 1854 he was farming at Seclusion, near Egypt. Borden was married on February 3, 1838, to Frances Mary Heard, sister of William J. E. Heard; after Frances's death he married Martha Ann Stafford, on July 19, 1842. By his second wife Borden had three sons. He died on April 28, 1864. Source

Note: This is a cenotaph. Originally this small piece of land was part of William Joseph Stafford's plantation grounds, which was known to have had a small family cemetery. The specific location of this cemetery has been lost, but in the 1960s local historians deemed this spot as the most likely area for the graveyard and several historical markers have been erected here denoting it so. His middle name is misspelled on his stone as Paolo.

COORDINATES
29° 36.362, -095° 35.185


William J. Stafford Cemetery
Stafford

March 4, 2016

Benjamin Franklin Hardin

   Benjamin Franklin (Frank) Hardin, surveyor, soldier, and legislator, the fourth son of Swan and Jerusha (Blackburn) Hardin, was born in Franklin County, Georgia, on January 25, 1803, and grew up in Maury County, Tennessee. He moved to Texas in 1826 and served under Stephen F. Austin against the Fredonian Rebellion of 1827. Hardin, who discontinued writing his first name in later years, was one of the Hardin brothers who, with their father, escaped into Texas after their feud with a prominent family in Maury County left two dead. Because their adversaries held various offices there, including one who was prosecuting attorney, the Hardins thought they would not receive a fair trail for murder; nevertheless, the Tennessee governor managed to have Franklin arrested and held at La Bahía (present Goliad), Texas, but when Tennessee officers failed to come for him, he was released, and he and his brothers were free to continue their services in Texas.

   Hardin was elected secretary of the ayuntamiento of Liberty in 1831 and was surveyor of the Atascosita District from 1834 to 1836. He was first lieutenant of infantry and fought in the siege of Bexar under Col. Francis White Johnson. Hardin served as a lieutenant in Capt. William M. Logan's company until June 1836. He carried the San Jacinto victory dispatch for Sam Houston to the United States border. Between July 7, 1836, and October 7, 1836, he was captain of a newly organized company and joined an expedition against the Indians. Hardin was put in charge of guarding Mexican officers interned at his brother's plantation until they were repatriated in 1837. He was Liberty county surveyor (1838-45) and served as colonel of the Second Brigade of the Texas militia (1842-43). In 1839 he was appointed postmaster by Sam Houston and moved his family from his plantation north of Liberty to a house in town, known as Seven Pines, where he lived with his wife and six children and a slave known as Aunt Harriet. Harriet had moved to Texas with the Hardins in 1826 and lived to be nearly 100 years old.

   Hardin continued to live near Liberty, where he was district surveyor from 1849 to 1852. He served in the Texas legislature in 1857, when Hardin County was formed from Liberty County and named in honor of the Hardin family. In the legislature he helped to get a surveyors' bill passed and the University of Texas founded and served as chairman of the Public Lands Committee.

   He married Cynthia O'Brien in 1839; they had six children. Hardin was a Methodist. He died at his residence in Liberty on April 21, 1878. State historical markers were placed at the Hardin family cemetery in 1936 and the Liberty home site, Seven Pines, in 1988. Source

COORDINATES
30° 03.791, -094° 48.168


City Cemetery
Liberty