Along with everything else, Hurricane Harvey took with it decades worth of files, maps, notes, coordinates, names and research I had on my external hard drive; so for the time being, this site will be on hiatus until I finish republishing. I will upload as I go, so each post will reappear on its original date and can be found in the Archive section in the right sidebar. If you need to contact me for any reason in the duration, my contact info is found in my profile. Wish me luck, guys. - JES

February 26, 2016

Isaac McGary

   Isaac McGary, early settler and soldier, was born in 1800 in Butler County, Ohio, the son of John McGary. He moved to Texas with Stephen F. Austin and fought at the battle of San Jacinto, after which he helped guard Antonio L√≥pez de Santa Anna. McGary received a donation land grant for his participation in the battle, and his name is on the San Jacinto monument. He also served as a private under Capt. James Gillaspie in the Mexican War. His name is on the Gillaspie Memorial Marker in Huntsville. McGary served as sheriff of Montgomery County in 1843. When Walker County was formed, he was elected the first county clerk. He served in this capacity from 1846 to 1852. In 1854 he was chief justice of Walker County. McGary was a Mason in Forest Lodge No. 19. In the 1850 census he is listed as fifty years old, married to Elizabeth (Visier), a French immigrant, age thirty-four. Three children are listed. Elizabeth died in 1853 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Huntsville. While on a trip to the coast, McGary died in Galveston in 1866. He was buried in Soldier's Rest Cemetery, Galveston. Source

Note: Unmarked. Isaac McGary was buried in Soldiers Rest, a section of the Old Potters Field cemetery set aside specifically for veterans in 1864. His tombstone, as well as most of the grave markers in the cemetery, was washed away in the 1900 hurricane. During the reconstruction of the island, the ruined graveyard was renamed Oleander Cemetery, the ground level was raised several feet and the original section boundaries of Soldier's Rest, and all the graves therein, were lost.

COORDINATES
N/A

Soldiers Rest (defunct)
Oleander Cemetery
Galveston

February 9, 2016

Albert Sidney Johnston

   Albert Sidney Johnston, Confederate general, son of John and Abigail (Harris) Johnston, was born at Washington, Kentucky, on February 2, 1803. He attended Transylvania University before he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, from which he graduated in June 1826. He served at Sackett's Harbor, New York, in 1826, with the Sixth Infantry at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, in 1827, and as regimental adjutant in the Black Hawk War. On January 20, 1829, he married Henrietta Preston. Because of his wife's illness, he resigned his commission on April 22, 1834, and farmed near St. Louis in 1835. She died on August 12, 1835. In 1836 Johnston moved to Texas and enlisted as a private in the Texas Army. On August 5, 1836, he was appointed adjutant general by Thomas Jefferson Rusk and on January 31, 1837, he became senior brigadier general in command of the army to replace Felix Huston. A duel with Huston resulted; Johnston was wounded and could not immediately take the command. On December 22, 1838, he was appointed secretary of war for the Republic of Texas by President Mirabeau B. Lamar, and in December 1839 he led an expedition against the Cherokee Indians in East Texas. On March 1, 1840, Johnston returned to Kentucky, where, on October 3, 1843, he married Eliza Griffin, a cousin of his first wife. They returned to Texas to settle at China Grove Plantation in Brazoria County.

   During the Mexican War he was colonel of the First Texas Rifle Volunteers and served with W. O. Butler as inspector general at Monterrey, Mexico. On December 2, 1849, Johnston became paymaster in the United States Army and was assigned to the Texas frontier. He went with William S. Harney to the Great Plains in 1855, and on April 2, 1856, he was appointed colonel of the Second Cavalry. In 1858 Johnston received command of a Utah expedition to escort a new territorial governor and three judges to Salt Lake City and to establish a military presence, due to Morman resistance of federal authority. He set up Camp Scott near the ruins of Fort Bridger in the fall of 1858, and later selected a site southwest of Salt Lake City for a permanent camp - Camp Floyd which was dedicated in November of 1859. Johnston remained in charge of Camp Floyd until 1860 when he was sent to the Pacific Department and stationed at San Francisco. At the beginning of the Civil War in 1861, he resigned his commission in the United States Army, refused the federal government's offer of a command, and returned overland to Texas.

   In Austin 1861 Jefferson Davis appointed Johnston a general in the Confederate Army and in September assigned him command of the Western Department. Johnston issued a call for men and formed and drilled an army, but it lacked men and organization, had a huge area to defend, and could not control the rivers that were vital to military success in the region. In February 1862, following Federal victories on the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, he moved his line of defense to the vicinity of Nashville, Tennessee, and later to Corinth, Mississippi. On April 6, 1862, he was killed while leading his forces at the battle of Shiloh. He was temporarily buried at New Orleans. By special appropriation, the Texas Legislature, in January 1867, had his remains transferred to Austin for burial in the State Cemetery. In 1905 a stone monument executed by noted sculptor Elisabet Ney was erected at the site. Source

COORDINATES
30° 15.913, -097° 43.597

Confederate Field
Texas State Cemetery
Austin

February 2, 2016

Reuben White

   Reuben White, one of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred, was the son of William and Amy White and was born in 1795 in what is now Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. In the War of 1812 he served in Capt. Shadrack Porter's Company, Baker's Regiment, Louisiana Militia. He married Christina Faulk on June 15, 1818. They had at least eight children. The family was Catholic. He moved to Texas in 1824 with his widowed mother and received his grant of one league on the east bank of the San Jacinto River. He was listed with his family in the Atascosito Census in 1826 as a farmer and stock raiser. Reuben and his brother Henry White were on the grand jury of Harris County in 1837. In 1838 he appeared before the Board of Land Commissioners of Harris County to petition for one labor of land due him as a colonist. He appeared on the Ad Valorem Tax Rolls of the Republic of Texas in 1837 and in subsequent years. His taxable property (after considerable exemptions) was 2,214 acres of land, two pleasure horses, 150 cattle, and one clock. He was a successful farmer-rancher of the period. Reuben White died before October 1848, as proven by a probate court record of his estate in Harris County in 1848. After White died, his widow married Hervey Whiting. In 1854 she married Isaac Curtis, and in the 1860 census she and her two youngest sons were living with a son-in-law, Thomas W. McComb, at Lynchburg. Source

Note: Unmarked. The modern-day White Cemetery evolved from the original White family cemetery, now located to the rear left of the grounds. Although Reuben White's grave location has been lost, he is likely buried in the area shown in the photo below, as this site contains the oldest graves and the still-standing tombstone of his youngest brother William. The coordinates given below are from William's grave.

COORDINATES
29° 51.307, -095° 03.740

1824 Lawn Crypts A-B Section
White Cemetery
Highlands