Along with everything else, Hurricane Harvey took with it decades worth of files, maps, notes, coordinates, names and research I had on my external hard drive; so for the time being, this site will be on hiatus until I finish republishing. I will upload as I go, so each post will reappear on its original date and can be found in the Archive section in the right sidebar. If you need to contact me for any reason in the duration, my contact info is found in my profile. Wish me luck, guys. - JES

January 31, 2017

James Long

   James Long, leader of the Long expedition, was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, probably in 1793. He was taken by his parents to Kentucky and then to Tennessee. He joined the United States Army to serve as a surgeon in the War of 1812 and after the battle of New Orleans went to Natchez, Mississippi, practiced medicine at Port Gibson, and, at the suggestion of his wife, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long, bought a plantation near Vicksburg. In 1817 he was associated with W. W. Walker in the merchandising business. Two years later the Adams-Onís Treaty aroused such strong opposition in Natchez that prominent citizens planned a filibustering expedition to conquer Texas and placed Long in command. After the final surrender of the expedition, Long was imprisoned for a time in San Antonio and in Monterrey, Nuevo León. He went to Mexico City in March 1822 to plead his case before Agustín de Iturbide, but on April 8, 1822, he was shot and killed by a guard. The shooting was said to be an accident, but there was some evidence that the guard had been hired by José Félix Trespalacios to kill Long. Source

COORDINATES
29° 35.132, -095° 45.801

Masonic Section West
Morton Cemetery
Richmond

January 24, 2017

Elizabeth Plemmons Tumlinson

   Elizabeth Plemmons Tumlinson, one of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred, was born to John Plemmons and Elizabeth Jane in Lincoln County, North Carolina, on July 7, 1778. In 1796 she married John Jackson Tumlinson, Sr., and they had seven children. In 1821 Elizabeth and her husband left Arkansas for Texas to settle in the colony being established by Stephen F. Austin. Elizabeth was widowed in July 1823 when her husband, who was serving as alcalde of the Colorado District, was killed by Indians while on a mission to secure ammunition for the Texas Rangers. On August 16, 1824, Elizabeth received a league and a labor of land that had been selected by her husband, on the Colorado River at the site of present-day Columbus. Elizabeth lived on this property until her death in January 1829. Following her death the land was divided into six sections among her heirs on December 19, 1833. Source

Note: This is likely a cenotaph

COORDINATES
30° 15.925,  -097° 43.591

Confederate Field
Texas State Cemetery
Austin