September 30, 2016

Joseph Ehlinger

Joseph Ehlinger was a native of Alsace, France. He served under Napoleon in the European wars during the early part of the nineteenth century and acquired both a practical and theoretical knowledge of military tactics. He brought his family to America and arrived in Texas just before the war for independence, locating in the vicinity of Houston, which had not yet been laid as a town. In the War of 1836 he joined Houston’s army on the Colorado River at about the site of the present city of Columbus, and owing to his previous military experience as a French soldier was appointed drill master for the Texas cavalry. He proved a valuable man to the cause, went with Houston’s army in its retreat across Texas, participated in the battle of San Jacinto, and was present when the Texans captured the Mexican president, Santa Anna.

With the success of the Texans in their struggle for independence, Ehlinger, after performing his own important share in that conflict, settled in the vicinity of Houston and became a farmer and stock man. His name is identified with the city of Houston because of the fact that he platted Ehlinger’s Addition, which is now in the heart of the city, but which, during his lifetime, was of little importance. His later years were spent quietly, and he died in 1853 and is buried at Houston. He was a member of the Catholic Church. His wife, Mary, is buried in the little cemetery on the Joseph Ehlinger League in Colorado County.

Note
This is a cenotaph. Founders Memorial Park, originally founded in 1836 as Houston's first city cemetery, was rapidly filled due to a yellow fever epidemic and closed to further burials around 1840. The cemetery became neglected over a period of time, often vandalized and was heavily damaged by the 1900 hurricane. In 1936, despite a massive clean up effort, a century of neglect had taken its toll. The vast majority of grave markers were either destroyed or missing and poor record keeping prevented locating individual graves. Several cenotaphs were placed in random areas throughout the park in honor of the more high-profile citizens buried there, but a great number of graves go unmarked to this day.

GPS Coordinates
29° 45.457, -095° 22.760


Founders Memorial Park
Houston

September 27, 2016

Don Brown

Don Albert Brown was born in Dayton, Texas, August 20, 1937, and attended Dayton High School where he played high school football from 1953 to 1955. Upon graduation, he attended the University of Houston where he played for the football team as a running back and defensive back from 1956 to 1958, earning an All-American honorable mention during his senior year. He played for the College All-Stars in 1959 against the defending NFL champions, the Baltimore Colts. In the game, he was involved in a serious collision with Bill Pellington which left him unconscious for several minutes.

He was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams, but immediately traded for Ollie Matson of the Chicago Cardinals. This trade was significant, as he was one of nine players traded for Matson. After the Cardinals, he had a brief stint with the Green Bay Packers under head coach Vince Lombardi before returning home in 1960 to try out for the newly formed Houston Oilers, where he ended his professional career in 1961. After his retirement from football, he returned to Dayton, bought some land and took up farming with his four brothers. Brown passed away on June 23, 2013 and buried in Dayton's Magnolia Park Cemetery.

GPS Coordinates
30° 03.192,  -094° 53.036

Section 8
Magnolia Park Cemetery   
Dayton

September 23, 2016

Lemuel Blakey

One of ten children born to Thomas and Nancy Anderson Blakey, Lemuel was born in Barron County, Kentucky on October 6, 1818. He left for Texas from Anderson Ferry, Jackson County, Tennessee with his parents and siblings, and arrived in Velasco in January 1832. His father died within a few hours of arriving from an undisclosed illness, leaving eighteen-year-old Lemuel the head of the family. He enlisted in the Texian army on February 29, 1836 for three months and fought at the Battle of San Jacinto as a member of Captain Jesse Billingsley's Company. He was one of nine men who was killed in battle, dying of wounds on April 21, 1836. He and his other fallen comrades were buried on the battlefield.

                              Note
This is a cenotaph. In 1881, a decision was made to place permanent memorials at the graves of those men who had been killed in the Battle of San Jacinto and buried on the battlefield. It was discovered, however, that all of the original wooden grave markers, except for Benjamin Brigham's, had rotted away and no one could remember exactly where the others rested. As a compromise, since the soldiers had been buried closely together, it was decided to place a cenotaph over Brigham's grave as a memorial to all of them.

GPS Coordinates
29° 45.232, -095° 05.363


San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site
La Porte

September 20, 2016

Thomas Hogan

Like many others who were recruited in New Orleans to fight for Texas independence, Thomas Hogan arrived at Velasco January 28, 1836, on the schooner Pennsylvania. He officially enlisted on February 13, 1836, for a period of two years, and began his service as a private in Amasa Turner's Company. He fought at the Battle of San Jacinto and afterward was transferred to Captain John Smith's Company. While stationed on Galveston Island, Thomas died of unknown causes on August 1, 1837 and buried in Houston.

Note
Unmarked. Founders Memorial Park, originally founded in 1836 as Houston's first city cemetery, was rapidly filled due to a yellow fever epidemic and closed to further burials around 1840. The cemetery became neglected over a period of time, often vandalized and was heavily damaged by the 1900 hurricane. In 1936, despite a massive clean up effort, a century of neglect had taken its toll. The vast majority of grave markers were either destroyed or missing and poor record keeping prevented locating individual graves. Several cenotaphs were placed in random areas throughout the park in honor of the more high-profile citizens buried there, but a great number of graves go unmarked to this day. Thomas Hogan's is one of them. There is a Thomas M. Hogan buried here with a marked grave, but it is not the same person.

GPS Coordinates
N/A


Founders Memorial Park
Houston

September 16, 2016

Edward M. Tanner

Born in 1815, Tanner came to Texas in 1827 with his family, likely settling in what is now Liberty County. In 1835, he was elected to the Committee of Safety for the municipality of Liberty, the first of many future city appointments. During the Revolution, he enlisted in the Texican army on March 6, 1836, and was assigned to Captain William M. Logan's Company of Liberty Volunteers, with whom he fought at the Battle of San Jacinto. Discharged that following June, he returned to Liberty and once again involved himself with local government and politics. On March 26, 1855, he was appointed the overseer for Precinct II, Liberty County, by the County Commissioners. In 1862, during the Civil War, he tried to enlist in the regular army, but was declared too old, and instead became attached to Wheat's Company A, Texas State Troops, a support unit. Tanner died some time in 1867 and buried in Boothe Cemetery in north Liberty County.

GPS Coordinates
30° 19.939, -094° 58.864


Boothe Cemetery
Tarkington Prairie

September 13, 2016

Jack English Hightower

Born September 6, 1926 in Memphis, Texas, Hightower served as a United States Navy sailor for two years during World War II. In 1949, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and in 1951 procured an LLB from Baylor Law School. He was admitted to the Texas bar in 1951 and immediately became district attorney of the 46th Texas Judicial District, based in Vernon, Wilbarger County, from 1951 to 1961. From 1953 to 1955, he was a member of the Texas House of Representatives. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in a special election held in 1961. While still living in Vernon, Hightower served from 1965 to 1974 in two reconfigured districts in the Texas Senate. He was a delegate to the tumultuous 1968 Democratic National Convention, which met in Chicago to nominate Vice President of the United States Hubert H. Humphrey for the presidency. That fall, Humphrey narrowly carried Texas over the Republican Richard M. Nixon and the American Independent Party nominee George Wallace of Alabama. In 1974, Hightower challenged four-term Republican Bob Price of Pampa for a congressional seat and won. Hightower was one of several Democrats elected due to voter anger over Watergate.

Hightower was a fairly moderate Democrat, and served a mostly rural district stretching from Amarillo to Wichita Falls on the east. The district had become increasingly friendly to Republicans at the national level, though Democrats continued to hold most local offices well into the 1990s. Hightower was reelected four times, mainly by stressing constituent services. However, in 1984, he was toppled by Republican challenger Beau Boulter of Amarillo, who benefited from Ronald W. Reagan's massive reelection landslide that year. After he left Congress, Hightower was the first assistant attorney general of Texas under Attorney General Jim Mattox from 1985 to 1987, then was elected to the Texas Supreme Court in 1988. In 1992, he obtained an LLM from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. He was later appointed by U.S. President Bill Clinton to the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, a position which he held from August 9, 1999, to July 19, 2004. A Freemason, Jack Hightower was a member of Vernon Lodge #655 and in 1972 served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas. Until his death, he had been the oldest living past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas. Hightower died on August 3, 2013 in Austin.

GPS Coordinates
30° 15.904, -097° 43.611

Monument Hill
Texas State Cemetery
Austin

September 9, 2016

Jethro Russell Bancroft

Jethro Bancroft came to Texas in 1830 and settled near Harrisburg. He participated in the Storming and Capture of Bexar, December 5 to 10, 1835, as part of the Texian army and after being discharged, moved to Lynchburg. On March 8, 1836, he re-enlisted as a member of Captain Thomas M. McIntire’s Company and fought at San Jacinto on April 21. He was discharged on June 8 and returned home. Bancroft died on January 7, 1848 while living in Harris County, and was buried in Houston's city cemetery.

Note
This is a cenotaph. Founders Memorial Park, originally founded in 1836 as Houston's first city cemetery, was rapidly filled due to a yellow fever epidemic and closed to further burials around 1840. The cemetery became neglected over a period of time, often vandalized and was heavily damaged by the 1900 hurricane. In 1936, despite a massive clean up effort, a century of neglect had taken its toll. The vast majority of grave markers were either destroyed or missing and poor record keeping prevented locating individual graves. Several cenotaphs were placed in random areas throughout the park in honor of the more high-profile citizens buried there, but a great number of graves go unmarked to this day.


GPS Coordinates
29° 45.445, -095° 22.765


Founders Memorial Park
Houston

September 6, 2016

Kenneth Franzheim II

The youngest of three children, Kenneth Franzheim II was born in New York City, NY on Sept 12, 1925, the son of Kenneth Franzheim, one of Houston's most renowned architects, and Elizabeth Simms Franzheim. After graduating from St. Paul's School in 1943, Kenneth served in the U.S. Army Air Corps from 1943 to 1945, and graduated from Yale University in 1948. During a successful 50 year career in the oil and gas industry, he was appointed by President Nixon as Ambassador to New Zealand, Western Samoa, Fiji, and Kingdom of Tonga from 1969 to 1972. A dedicated philanthropist, he established endowments to the University of Houston for the preservation of their rare book collection, a professorship and a fund to purchase texts in languages, literature, the arts and general humanities. He died October 29, 2007 and buried in the family plot in Glenwood Cemetery.

GPS Coordinates
29° 45.897, -095° 23.049

Section F3
Glenwood Cemetery
Houston

September 2, 2016

John Marshall Wade

John M. Wade, soldier, newspaperman, and surveyor, was born in New York in 1815. While in the Creek Indian nation, he was advised by Sam Houston to travel to Nacogdoches, Texas, where he arrived in October 1835. Wade joined Thomas J. Rusk's company, bound for Bexar, but became ill on the way and was left at San Felipe. While recovering from his illness he went to Montgomery, where he remained until after the Texas Declaration of Independence.

On March 12, 1836, he joined Capt. Joseph L. Bennett's company, afterwards commanded by Capt. William Ward. Wade and four others were detailed to man the "Twin Sisters." After the battle of San Jacinto he rejoined Ware's company and was discharged on June 12, 1836. On July 4, 1836, he was elected captain of a company stationed at Victoria.

A printer by profession, Wade worked on the Telegraph and Texas Register at Columbia and Houston. He was also deputy surveyor of Montgomery County. In 1845 he began publishing the Montgomery Patriot, which was afterwards moved to Huntsville. He returned to Montgomery County in 1854 and served again as deputy surveyor until after the Civil War, when he was removed from office by Governor Edmund J. Davis. Wade died in Travis County on October 9, 1879.

Note
Unmarked. The original sexton's records state that John Wade is buried in the plot below, somewhere near the upright tablet stone.

GPS Coordinates
30° 16.536, -097° 43.567
Section 2
Oakwood Cemetery
Austin