March 26, 2013

James Hope

James Hope, pioneer settler, moved to Texas from Alabama before July 10, 1824, when, as one of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred colonists, he received title to 1¼ leagues and two labors of land on the east bank of the Brazos River in what is now southwestern Brazos County. By March 26, 1825, he had exchanged his league for that of Bluford Brooks and was trying to secure vacant land on Mill Creek. Hope's daughter, Augusta, married Horatio Chriesman in 1825. The census of March 1826 listed Hope as a farmer and stock raiser aged between forty and fifty. His household included his wife, Althea, three sons, six daughters, and one servant.

In January 1827 at Mina, Hope signed a declaration of loyalty to the Mexican government and a protest against the Fredonian Rebellion. He bought garden lots in 1829 and in May 1830 advertised his Connecticut garden seed and fruit trees for sale at San Felipe. In August 1830 he and Gail Borden, Jr., were nominated commissioners to superintend surveying of town lots at San Felipe. Hope in December 1831 advertised that he was going to England and leaving his son Richard in charge of his 15,000 to 20,000 peach and nectarine trees. According to Worth S. Ray's Austin Colony Pioneers, the tax rolls of 1840 indicate that James Hope died about 1836. His sons took part in the battle of San Jacinto and later had a saddle shop at Washington-on-the-Brazos.

Note
Unmarked. During the Texas Revolution, the town of San Felipe was largely destroyed by Mexican troops chasing after the Texan army. Nothing was spared, not even the town graveyard. The majority of those buried here prior to 1836 are no longer marked, so although James Hope is known to be buried here, the exact location has been lost. The photo below shows the oldest section of the cemetery where it is possible he still rests.

GPS Coordinates
N/A


San Felipe de Austin Cemetery
San Felipe

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